Let’s ditch the paper ballots and go electric: Malcolm Turnbull

The practice of voting on paper ballots would be replaced by electronic methods if Malcolm Turnbull had his way.Federal Election 2013 coverageFederal Election 2013 results
杭州龙凤

The man likely to be the new communications minister has suggested Australia should consider a switch to electronic voting at federal elections in order to cut down on informal and fraudulent voting.

Malcolm Turnbull told ABC TV on Tuesday that Australia needed to look at implementing electronic voting, pointing to the large number of informal votes that were cast in the 2013 election.

“I think this is a very, very big issue,” he said. “The current system is fraught with errors”.

One of the highest ever rates of informal votes was recorded in Saturday’s election. According to the Australian Electoral Commission, the informal vote in the lower house has risen from 5.55 per cent in 2010 to 5.91 per cent this year. This is still down on the 6.34 per cent of informal votes cast in the 1984 federal election.

Mr Turnbull said that while some informal votes are protest votes – “there are some people who write ‘damn you all, down with politicians”‘ – the overwhelming majority of them were people making mistakes.

An AEC analysis of informal votes cast at the 2010 federal election found that 28.9 per cent were blank ballots and 16.9 per cent had scribbles, slogans or other protest marks.

The proportion of ballots that only had a ‘1’ was 27.8 per cent, 11.8 per cent had ticks and crosses and 9.2 per cent had non-sequential numbering.

Mr Turnbull, who was easily elected to his Sydney seat of Wentworth on Saturday, said he thought there was also a large number of people who voted fraudulently, “in the sense that they go to the polling place and say they’re someone else”.

He said he thought many people who did so were voting for a friend or relative who was away or sick – and that this was based on anecdotal evidence he had received since first running for Parliament in 2004.

Impersonating another voter in a polling place is a serious offence and carries a jail term of 6 months.

Mr Turnbull said that electronic voting could be done in a closed network in the polling booth so that it could not be hacked from the internet.

“I think we considerably overestimate the security of the current paper voting system, and we also overestimate the insecurity of electronic voting systems,” he said.

He suggested that an electronic system could point out to voters if they were about to cast an informal vote and give them the opportunity to correct it.

Mr Turnbull stressed that his electronic voting suggestion was not Coalition policy, and noted that Australian federal elections are routinely reviewed by a parliamentary committee.

The AEC has been monitoring electronic voting technologies for more than 10 years. The 2007 federal election included electronic voting trials for vision-impaired voters and for ADF and AFP personnel who were overseas and the AEC is expected to soon release a discussion paper on internet voting, to help public debate on the issue.

If electronic voting – either in a localised or remote set up – was to be introduced at the federal level, a change to the Electoral Act would be required.

At the state and territory-level, electronic voting measures have also been trialled since the early 2000s.

For example, the ACT first used electronic voting in the 2001 Assembly election. In the 2011 NSW state election, disabled, remote and interstate voters were able to vote via telephone and the internet.

The original release of this article first appeared on the website of Hangzhou Night Net.

Posted in 杭州龙凤 | Comments Off on Let’s ditch the paper ballots and go electric: Malcolm Turnbull

MEGA GALLERY: Pictures of our past 

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Stockton Co-operative Society Branch Store 1915-20.
杭州龙凤

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Donald’s chemist, grocer and ironmonger, Hamilton, in 1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Patrons in front of The City Arms Hotel, which later became the Hunter Hotel that was remodelled for the Market Square development. In the early 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Ocean Baths in the early 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Opening of the gates at Gregson Park, Hamilton, 1912.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Largs School Band leads a procession through the main street of Largs in 1915.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Girls on Nobbys breakwater, around 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Dungog railway station, 1915.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Corner of Watt street and Hunter Street appears to be before Hunter Street was extended east.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Coal loading North Carrington some time before 1918.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Laying the foundation stone of Hamilton Council chambers, September 11, 1919..

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Dungog railway station opening. August 14,1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Buckland’s shop in Dennison Street, Hamilton, 1919.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Morpeth tram, 1905 when the Morpeth Railway Station was at Pitnacree Road.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Post office Early 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The first steam train to arrive in Belmont, in around 1916.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Carrington bridge from Honeysuckle to where the wheat silos now stand.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Hetton Pitt Carrington 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Wallsend, Cowper Street, April 9, 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. 1913 Pascoe’s second store on the corner od Ida Street and Stuart Street Charlestown.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. the David Cohen and Co warehouse on the corner of Market Street and Scott Street Newcastle after it was partially destroyed by fire in 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Cohen Warehouse David Cohen & Co May 1909 Scott Street.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Wallsend April 9, 1906

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach from Parnell Place January 8, 1910

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Thomas Brothers, wholesale & retail butchers 1902.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Great Northern Hotel Newcastle taken from Customs House, 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Criterion Hotel Weston 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Stockton co-operative Store circa 1915.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Killingworth Hotel October 1903.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A turn of the century view of Newcastle Station from Customs House.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Shelter sheds at Newcastle Beach under construction.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Ocean Baths.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Eight hour day 1905.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach looking north from Ladies Beach September 9,1909.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Ocean Baths construction 1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach Note: tramsheds above Parnell Place early 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach, February 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach December 24, 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Dyke Wharves in Newcastle Harbour at the turn of the century.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A ship is being loaded with Aberdare small coal at the Basin Wharf in 1914

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Ferries at the Market Street Wharf early 1900’s

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Harbour in 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. McGregors butcher shop 87 Young Street Carrington 1902.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Boer War contingent of soldiers on Newcastle Queens Wharf .

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Perkins st Perkins Street Boat Harbour 1904.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Civic Block Hunter St in 1909.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Customs House Tower general view of goods yard.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Butcher boats in a Newcastle boat harbour, circa 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.The funeral of Sergeant James Doyle October 10 1908 passing along Union Street Cooks Hill Newcastle.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Lambton Park in early January 1900. The crowd has gathered to watch a baseball game.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.unidentified man with rabbit belts and black dog and gun sitting near creek. Believed to be at Gundy.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Adolphe rescue Victoria rescue boat

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Martha Dark’s funeral cortege, turning into Queen Street from Grey Street, Clarencetown, on it’s way to the Stony Creek Cemetery, Sunday, 17th June, 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Copy picture of original Cooks Hill Surf Life Saving Club members in 1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Newcastle Post Office Hunter and Bolton Streets, Newcastle, NSW, 7 May 1904

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach promenade February 12,1912.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The last big line-up of windjammers on the Stockton shore was in 1914 as World War I erupted.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Merewethr Beach steam tram terminus September 21, 1903

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Colour copy steam train emerging from Scott Street onto Hunter Street Newcastle in 1905.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Arrival of Wallabies 8th January 1916 Hunter Street Newcastle in front of Newcastle Post Office.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Sailing ships at Queens Wharf near traffic roundabout about 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Grand Hotel, corner Church and Bolton Streets.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Butcher boats in a Newcastle boat harbour, circa 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Hunter Street Newcastle about 1905.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.1902 Pilot Station Newcastle Harbour.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Newcastle Hunter Street early 1900’s Hunter Street between Watt Street and Bolton Street.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The busy east end of Hunter Street Newcastle in the early years of the 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Kings Wharf 1906 Newcastle Harbour.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Newcastle Railway refreshment room Newcastle about 1909.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hexham coal loading operation, perhaps around the turn of the century.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.Newcastle Harbour: looking from the Cathedral across Newcastle, Newcastle East, the harbour to Nobbys, Stockton Bight, the River Islands and Port Waratah.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Unlabeled. From the transport collection Ken Magor.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Unlabeled. From the transport collection Ken Magor.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Store, 1903.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. the Sulphide works at Cockle Creek as it ws about 1900, three years after it opened.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Prince of Wales visit to West Maitland July 25 1920.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Armistice Day in Hunter Street Newcastle at the Cenotaph, November 11, 1918.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Morning Herald Newcastle Newspapers Compositors on linotype matches in the days of hot metal typesetting machines.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The corner of Hunter and Brown streets, Newcastle before the construction of the expanded Scotts building in 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Employees of Rundles tailoring at a staff picnic at Cockle creek in 1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Mariners pool, canoe pool, near Newcastle ocean baths.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Nelson Street Wallsend back in 1906 when a railway line terminated there.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Paterson Wharf, 1909.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Buildings on Nobbys.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Lifeboat Victoria II on Newcastle Harbour during the 1908 Newcastle harbour regatta

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Harbour crowded with sailing ships about 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Cowper Street Bridge The original Cowper street coal railway bridge to Carrington, above, in about 1909.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle beach esplanade Newcastle circa 1905.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Stockton’s General Washington Hotel on the corner of Mitchell and Hunter streets Stockton, 1903.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The superphosphate plant, established at Cockle Creek in 1913 .

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. People clustered around a natural rock pool where the Newcastle Ocean baths now exists, about 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The visit of the Duke of Cornwall and York to Newcastle in 1901.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle beach esplanade Newcastle circa 1905

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL: 1800s Newcastle

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Shortland Park, just behind Newcastle Beach, circa 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Styx Creek, Islington, in 1917 when engineers had to increase the size of the railway bridge’s steel spans.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Scott Street, near Newcastle railway station, circa 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hunter’s Street’s “wild West End” with steam trams and horse and carts dates from about 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The windjammer fleet berthed three abreast at dolphins in Newcastle Harbour, circa 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Willie Puddey felling the largest Blackbutt to be cut by axe on the Watagans, 4 November 1904.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Swansea Bridge, Lake Macquarie, circa 19010.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A large ocen-going ship, possibly Harriet King, at Clarence Town loading timber.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hamilton Wesleyan Church on the corner of Beaumont and Tudor streets in 1903.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle’s former post office in Hunter Street, at its opening on August 8, 1903.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Catherine Hill Bay’s second jetty.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Soldiers embarking on train at Broadmeadow railway station during World War I, 1914

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A windjammer loading coal from small, wooden coal hoppers, at Honeysuckle Wharf in 1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The old Castlemaine Brewery, Hunter Street.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hunter Street Newcastle looking west.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The popularity of the “old Junction barn” when it was the Star Theatre.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The premises of tailor H.P. Cornish at 523 Hunter Street, near Union Street, in 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Seven sailing ships are lashed together, moored at the Stockton ballast ground jetties in October 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle waterfront from near Brown Street to Darby Street in 1906,

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Nobbys from about 1900 shows one of the four tunnels that was dug in a bid to blow it up.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Beach carnival, circa 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Merewether Beach 1915.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Carrington hydraulic power house in Bourke Street Carrington, 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Site of the old Palais Royale.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Macquarie House, oOn the corner of Watt street and Church street.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The first Newcastle-built surf boat, the Spray, constructed in 1913 by Newcastle Surf Club members.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A warehouse belonging to Australian Agricultural Company, or A.A. Company in Wharf Road, Hunter Street.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The old old brewery, Hunter street west.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Store had a strong hold on city retailing for years.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A humble cottage (at right) at the junction of Nobbys Road and Fort Drive, possibly in 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Harbour East End rail yards.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The shortage of steel in World War I led to the first 14 kilometres of the Chichester line being made of watertight, woodstave pipe.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Original Redhead Beach Surf Club which was built in 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Taken on April 14, 1902, the photograph shows a large picnic party outside the entrance to number one tunnel at Merewether.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. McMyler Hoist being constructed at the Carrington Dyke in late 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Lambton Colliery, Redhead.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Baker law firm 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. King street and Darby Street – Frederick Ash’s import firm.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle historical Newcastle High School on The Hill in May 1901 for the visit of the Duke of Cornwall and York

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Hospital looking south.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The old Newcastle Surf Club

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hunter Street looking west from Watt Street in the early 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. the Perkins Street boat harbour, now long filled in.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle hospital Hannell Wing, circa 1900

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle’s original power station in 1903 (when Tyrrell Street was known as Sydney Street)

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The club team which took part in the world’s first surf carnival at Newcastle Beach in 1908.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Fish Market Wharf which once existed at the foot of Market Street Newcastle.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. West Wallsend Post Office.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Dora Creek, circa 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Wallarah Colliery Catherine Hill Bay Lake Macquarie.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Speers (or Speirs) Point Hotel 20th August 1902.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Sulphide Works at Cockle Creek in its early days.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Wangi Wangi.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. South Belmont.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Toronto in late January 1903.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Early homes in Speers Point Lake Macquarie

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Swansea Bridge.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Council chambers 1915 Lake Macquarie

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Sawmill at Middle Camp, Catherine Hill Bay, Lake Macquarie, 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Police protecting volunteer workers at Wallarah Colliery during the great rail and tramways strike of 1917

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Kiliaben Bay, Coal Point in 1901.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The training ship Tingira in Lake Macquarie.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Lake Macquarie waterfront from the Toronto Hotel.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The house of Joseph Holmes who settled Holmesville.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A panorama of the port of Newcastle around 1900 when coalminers worked in the deep tunnels beneath the harbour.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Esplanade looking back towards Speers Point from Warners Bay Lake Macquarie.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle’s East End, looking east, towards the harbour entrance. The picture, probably from around 1900, shows coal loading at King’s Wharf.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Lambton colliery at Redhead in 1909

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Tudor Street Hamilton 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The Store.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle ice rink.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hunter Street, circa 1900, showing the ornate towers of the old Newcastle Borough Markets which were demolished in 1915.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The unveiling of Australia’s first soldier statue, Newcastle 1916.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The opening of Fennell Bay bridge, on August 23, 1902.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Former East End rail marshalling yards in the early 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. The barquentine Kate Tatham shortly after it capsized in Newcastle Harbour in November, 1907

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Kings wharf lug ‘Hinton’ near Watt Street / Customs House.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Iron Bridge spanning Hunter Street, advertising Ireland’s Breakfast Food.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. New wing Newcastle Hospital.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Morisset street parade celebrating the end of WWI, in 1918.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hunter Street and Bolton street, probably in the 1900s, looking westward.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Harbour scene about 1900 looking towards Nobbys lighthouse, at far left.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Sawyers Gully school gates in 1919 on ANZAC day.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Mailtand Showground 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Empire Day West Maitland 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Official visit to Maitland Town Hall 1905.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Mailtland railway line.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Carrington Motor Company’s Maitland fleet, 1911.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. High Street West Maitland 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Moriris’s Aerated Water Works, 1907.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Maitland long bridge and tram, 1915.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Upper Bowman, 1907.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Bolton St, circa 1910.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. High St, West Maitland about 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. the steam packet wharf located between Market and Newcomen streets about 1900.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle waterfront about 1906.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. A GROUP of Christian Chinese in traditional dress (at left) prepare for a Newcastle parade, probably about 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. West Wallsend.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Chinese festival parade.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Winn’s store, Hunter and Brown Streets, 1900s.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Soldiers embarking on a train at Broadmeadow, 1914.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Wallsend racecourse 1917.Leading is Angie Man ridden by Andy Bennett

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Coffee Pot train with its vertical boiler shown about 1910 near the tunnel through Merewether cliff.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. the Merewether family home, circa 1900, when it was called The Ridge.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Newcastle Harbour.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Swansea Bridge 1909.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. TC Frith Boolaroo.

ARCHIVAL REVIVAL 1900s: Photographs from the Newcastle Herald’s files. Hunter Street west about 1914.

Grand Hotel, now and in 1900sDonald Chemist – Now and 1911Hunter Street old brewery site – Now and early 1900sNewcastle beach, now and 1900sNewcastle Beach from King Edward Park, now and 1900sWatt and Hunter Streets – Now and 1900sOld Shortland Park – Now and late 1900sFLASHBACK FRIDAY: Staying cool through the years

FROM THE ARCHIVES: The Bathurst 1000

Above, click through the carousel for a gallery of images from the Newcastle Herald archives cataloguing our history from 1900 to 1920.

The Grand Hotel, on the corner of Church and Bolton streets, Newcastle, has seen some changes over the years.

Not to mention the patronage of hundreds of legal eagles, judges and criminals. And journalists.

The old pub faces more changes in clientele in the near future, as the legal precinct shifts west.

Move your cursor over the vintage image, shot on glass negative more than a century ago by the Kerry photographic studio. Watch as past and future blend, and ponder the changes the future has in store.

The photo is one of hundreds collated here in our latest “Archival Revival” release of pictures dredged from its physical and digital archives and placed on the web for readers to enjoy.

Posted in 杭州龙凤 | Comments Off on MEGA GALLERY: Pictures of our past 

Eddie Hayson banned for six months by Racing NSW in fallout from More Joyous inquiry

Eddie Hayson leaves NSW Racing headquarters after giving evidence at the More Joyous inquiry in May. Photo: Kate GeraghtyPunter and brothel owner Eddie Hayson has been warned of racecourses for six months by Racing NSW as the fall out from the More Joyous inquiry continues.
杭州龙凤

Hayson was a key witness in the inquiry claiming he had been told by two sources that the Gai Waterhouse-trained More Joyous had problems in the lead-up to the All-Aged Stakes, where she only beat one runner home despite being the favourite.

After the race, the horse’s owner John Singleton spectacularly dumped Waterhouse claiming her son and prominent bookmaker Tom Waterhouse had inside information regarding the health of the star mare.

The allegations led Racing NSW to open an inquiry.

At the inquiry, Hayson refused to reveal the names of two people to stewards, one of which was allegedly connected to the Waterhouse stable, and Racing NSW took action against him for obstructing and hindering an investigation.

“Racing NSW is on record time and again as saying integrity in this industry is paramount. Accordingly, no individual’s interest should outweigh the confidence of the public, and particularly punters, in the integrity of the industry,” said Racing NSW chief executive Peter V’landys.

“This was a very important matter. A particular line of enquiry that Stewards wished to pursue couldn’t proceed, because of the actions of Mr Hayson.

“By refusing to co-operate, he left Racing NSW with little option but to issue a determination; one that is intended to protect the industry by acting as a deterrent to Mr Hayson and others about similar conduct.”

The ban means Hayson can not enter racecourses or training centres, can not own an interest in a thoroughbred or place bets on thoroughbred racing.

Hayson appeared with his legal team at the show cause hearing last week, where he was given the opportunity to state why he should not be warned off.

‘‘I am not actually upset at all. I haven’t been to the races in three years,’’ said Hayson.

‘‘It’s an absolute joke, to be honest. They had already made up their minds.

“What have I done? They say it’s because I didn’t supply the two names. If I did they would have lost their jobs. All they were telling me was what they thought was the truth. It turned out to be true.

“It is not my fault that the horse was not presented in a fit and proper manner.”

Hayson is the only person to banned from racing because of the More Joyous inquiry.

The original release of this article first appeared on the website of Hangzhou Night Net.

Posted in 杭州龙凤 | Comments Off on Eddie Hayson banned for six months by Racing NSW in fallout from More Joyous inquiry

John Worsfold turns down Lions coaching job: report

Goodbye? John Worsfold has kept a low profile since leaving the Eagles coaching job. Photo: Sebastian CostanzoFormer West Coast Eagles coach John Worsfold has reportedly turned his back on the possibility of coaching the Brisbane Lions.
杭州龙凤

afl杭州夜生活m.au is reporting that the Lions have confirmed that the 12-year Eagles mentor has told them he would not be seeking the job, made vacant when Brisbane sacked its coach of five years, Michael Voss, three rounds before the end of the season.

Worsfold resigned from his Eagles job last Thursday, but has not made a public appearance since, creating doubt about his future intentions. It is believed he is a seeking a complete break from the game for the next year, after a 24-year involvement as coach and player with the Eagles.

Brisbane lost out in its attempt to convince former Swans coach Paul Roos to take up their coaching vacancy. He subsequently accepted a role with Melbourne.

In a statement released last Thursday, Worsfold did not sound like a man ready to take on a new coaching challenge.

“I have come to that decision around the fact I shouldn’t do the job if I don’t have the energy to give it absolutely everything; that wouldn’t be the right thing for the club and basically that’s where it got to,” Worsfold wrote.

“My time is done as coach of this footy club. I couldn’t have had a better time, I couldn’t have asked for any more. I certainly couldn’t have given any more,” he wrote.

A swathe of young players picked inside the top-30 have indicated they want to leave the club, and general manager of football operations Dean Warren said today that “It’d make it easier (to negotiate with players) if we did have a new coach, no doubt about that.”

Warren is part of a panel making the coaching decision that wants the next Lions coach named before the free agency period commences.

Former Adelaide coach Neil Craig and highly-regarded Hawthorn assistant coach Adam Simpson have been interviewed by Brisbane, afl杭州夜生活m.au reports.

Age columnist Robert Walls last week called for supporters to petition for the return of Voss, calling the decision to sack him “inept”..

“The bottom line is, Voss has coached well over the past two seasons and was just finding his feet as a senior coach. Along with the Scott twins, he is the youngest of the senior AFL coaches. Unless there was someone extremely special prepared to coach the Lions, and it appears there is not, Voss should’ve been given a new two-year deal to build on the solid base he has set up,” Walls wrote.

The original release of this article first appeared on the website of Hangzhou Night Net.

Posted in 杭州龙凤 | Comments Off on John Worsfold turns down Lions coaching job: report

Elton John to perform Liberace tribute at Emmy Awards

Elton John will pay tribute to flamboyant American entertainer Liberace (pictured) at this month’s Emmy Awards.Flamboyant music superstar Elton John is no stranger to a dazzling pair of spectacles, an ermine coat and a few gaudy diamond rings.
杭州龙凤

But will he be wearing them when he takes to the stage later this month as part of a tribute to iconic American pianist Liberace at the the annual Emmy Awards?

The critically acclaimed US drama Behind The Candelabra, a biography of Liberace’s life from director Steven Soderbergh, is one of the most nominated programs at this year’s awards.

Behind The Candelabra has drawn 15 nominations, including nods for best miniseries or telemovie, and best actor nods for its stars Michael Douglas and Matt Damon.

Although it screened on US television, it was released in cinemas around the world. It also drew almost universal acclaim at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year.

The producers of the event have confirmed John, the 66-year-old British pop icon, will perform as part of a tribute to Liberace’s career.

Both Douglas and Damon, who play Liberace and his lover, Scott Thorson, in the project, will be presenters at the awards.

At the peak of his career, in the 1950s and 1960s, Liberace was performing around the world on a gold-leafed Bluthner Grand piano, topped by his signature candelabra.

He was also a television superstar, with more than 30 million people tuning in weekly to watch The Liberace Show.

In 1956, one British columnist described him as a “winking, sniggering, chromium-plated, scent-impregnated, luminous, quivering, giggling, fruit-flavoured, mincing, ice-covered heap of mother-love”.

According to reports, the legendary Diahann Carroll, comedians Tina Fey and Amy Poehler and sisters Zooey and Emily Deschanel will also be presenters at this year’s Emmy Awards.

How I Met Your Mother star Neil Patrick Harris will be the host.Reality could be a real competition at EmmysComedy: Why Sheldon deserves an Emmy

In some respects, reality TV has endured a bumpy ride to legitimacy. And in that sense, on Emmy night, reality is still the bridesmaid. All eyes are firmly fixed on the drama categories and even comedy takes a half-step behind the front line.

Despite that, and despite the prejudice which still exists in the industry (and to a lesser extent, the audience), these are tightly contested categories with a lot at stake.

So, the first question is, exactly what is reality TV? The Emmy Awards split the genre into two categories – reality/competition, where there is a competitive game structure, and straight reality, which is either observational or informational.

Outstanding reality-competition program

The Amazing Race (CBS)Dancing with the Stars (ABC)Project Runway (Lifetime)So You Think You Can Dance (Fox)Top Chef (Bravo)The Voice (NBC)

Unequivocally the rock star nominee in this category is The Amazing Race, the reality show which even TV snobs will begrudgingly admit is rather brilliant. While the format is old enough to have wrinkles, it seems to return each year in competitive shape.

Unlike almost all of the other shows in the category, it has also resisted the evolutionary change which seems to morph every show into a celebrity, kids, couples or other tricked-up version of itself.

The Amazing Race remains The Amazing Race, and is empowered for that reason.

The only real threat here is surely The Voice, and in the US The Voice isn’t quite the game-changing juggernaut that it is in Australia.

Here it re-drew the map and forced its competitors to lift the bar or risk looking ridiculous. (To their credit, they did. The X Factor, particularly, responded to The Voice in a very strong and meaningful way.)

In the US it’s fortunes have been slower to define themselves, and, like most American talent shows, seems to be constantly tweaking with its format and lineup. So The Voice comes into this category a contender, but one that’s not too deadly.

Of the remaining three, Project Runway is the star. It’s solidly produced, and sharply delivered, but is not a strong enough player to bump the genre’s darling off the top rung.

Outstanding reality program

Antiques Roadshow (PBS)Deadliest Catch (Discovery Channel)Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives (Food Network)Mythbusters (Discovery Channel)Shark Tank (ABC)Undercover Boss (CBS)

The stakes are unequivocally lesser in this category, though you’d have to think Deadliest Catch is the strongest contender, though ABC’s Shark Tank and CBS’s Undercover Boss could be strong players.

The good news with this category is that we’ll know the the winner early. It is one of the awards announced at the Creative Arts Emmy Awards which are held on September 15. (There are so many Emmy categories, the awards are split across two nights.)

Outstanding host for a reality or reality-competition program

Tom Bergeron for Dancing with the Stars (ABC)Anthony Bourdain for The Taste (ABC)Cat Deeley for So You Think You Can Dance (Fox)Heidi Klum & Tim Gunn for Project Runway (Lifetime)Ryan Seacrest for American Idol (Fox)Betty White for Betty White’s Off Their Rockers (NBC)

Where do we start? Ryan Seacrest is Hollywood’s darling, a young(ish) man who seems to be producing every other show on TV, and hosting everything else.

This award was, in historical terms, the property of Jeff Probst from Survivor, but he seems to have all but faded into the shadows. Last year it was won by Dancing with the Stars host Tom Bergeron, but that franchise has lost a little of its steam this year.

So, who might win? Seacrest seems to make a lot of noise in the corridors of power, but that doesn’t necessarily translate into Emmy votes. You’d think Phil Keoghan would be a shoe-in, because of the consistent winning streak of The Amazing Race, but that doesn’t seem to have come to much either.

If you were a gambling man, you’d back Bergeron. If you think the winds of change are blowing, then it’s even money on Seacrest or Deeley. Outside chance, but a much-loved favourite, is Betty White.

Hollywood loves a lot of things, but it loves nothing like a grand old dame.

Next week: Miniseries and telemovie

The 65th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards will be broadcast on Monday, September 23, on FOX8 from 9am.

The original release of this article first appeared on the website of Hangzhou Night Net.

Posted in 杭州龙凤 | Comments Off on Elton John to perform Liberace tribute at Emmy Awards